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Hiring might be slow, but talent shortage lingers on

Category: Vocational Training,  News Source: Others,  Updated-On: Jun 5 2013
A study finds 61% employers in India are finding it difficult to get right staff, a problem endemic world over.
 
The job scene might appear bleak with not much hiring, but companies are simultaneously finding it tough to fill in vacancies that are created.
 
A survey by HR firm Manpower India says almost 61% employers in India are experiencing difficulty finding right talent, and experts say a similar situation prevails across the globe.
 
"Jobs are available, but getting the right kind of talent is a big issue with many firms today," says Rajeev Menon from skills assessment firm MeritTrac.
 
The "right kind of talent" requires candidates to have communication skills, ability to identify and analyse problems, and figure out solutions, logical reasoning, willingness to learn, and theoretical knowledge in a particular domain that can be applied practically.
 
"Not just soft skills, but candidates right out of college have to be trained in technical skills and their application," says Menon.
 
Experts say knowledge of a domain different from what one has studied is also necessary in competitive times. For example, simply knowing Java, C++ is not enough for fresh engineers, says Anand Nagarajan, CEO of Dexler Information Solutions.
 
"Fundamentals of business like basics of business ethics, marketing, finance, etc are also needed to get an edge."
 
Menon say due to a mismatch between academic learning and industry requirements, companies find it tough to get right candidates. 
 
When it comes to filling vacancies, jobs in accounting, finance, IT and engineering are most difficult, says the survey.
 
"Like in retail, there is a need for skilled people for front-line jobs, for logistics and stores. Job seekers are available, but they do not fit into the kind of available jobs," says Thiruvengadam P, senior director, human capital advisory, Deloitte India Thiruvengadam.
 
Thus companies end up spending between Rs2-5 lakhs per candidate just to train them for a period of 3-6 months, and make them skill-able.
 
Source: www.dnaindia.com
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